A qualitative study of osteopaths’ beliefs about pain management for patients with symptomatic endometriosis

Authors:
  • Callan Nuala
Keywords: Endometriosis, Endometriosis Treatment, Osteopathic Treatment of Endometriosis, Endometriosis and Pain Management
Type of Publication: Thesis/Dissertation
Institute: British School of Osteopathy
Publication date: 2011 Entry date: 2012 February, 03
Status: Finished Recommended: No
Country: United Kingdom Language: English
Available at: http://bso-web.bso.ac.uk/BSO-All/Library-public/IntranetTest/PROJECTS_2011_files/Projects/CallanNuala.doc

Abstract

Background: Two million UK females of reproductive age live with endometriosis (NHS, 2010). Current research fails to identify definitively the onset, aetiology or progression of endometriosis, hence no cure has been found. This condition commonly presents to osteopaths as pain (Stone, 2007) but there is limited research regarding how osteopathic treatment may help patients living with symptomatic endometriosis (Tettambel, 2005).

Objectives: The study explored osteopaths’ beliefs and experiences of treating patients with symptomatic endometriosis to identify whether patients appear to benefit from osteopathic treatment.

Method: Eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of osteopaths Interviews were analysed using content analysis consistent with elements of grounded theory.

Results: Eight main themes emerged; osteopaths’ interests, sites of pain, types of pain, aims of treatment, osteopathic techniques used, treatment thought to reduce symptoms/increase symptoms and contraindications.

Conclusions: This sample of osteopaths believed endometriosis was oestrogen dependent. The 1-4 grading of endometriosis was crucial to understand the effect of osteopathic treatment. It was concluded that osteopathic treatment in grade 1-2 endometriosis could help to reduce symptoms but 3-4 required Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) inhibition or surgical intervention.

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Abstract (English)

Title: A qualitative study of osteopaths’ beliefs about pain management for patients with symptomatic endometriosis

Background: Two million UK females of reproductive age live with endometriosis (NHS, 2010). Current research fails to identify definitively the onset, aetiology or progression of endometriosis, hence no cure has been found. This condition commonly presents to osteopaths as pain (Stone, 2007) but there is limited research regarding how osteopathic treatment may help patients living with symptomatic endometriosis (Tettambel, 2005).

Objectives: The study explored osteopaths’ beliefs and experiences of treating patients with symptomatic endometriosis to identify whether patients appear to benefit from osteopathic treatment.

Method: Eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of osteopaths Interviews were analysed using content analysis consistent with elements of grounded theory.

Results: Eight main themes emerged; osteopaths’ interests, sites of pain, types of pain, aims of treatment, osteopathic techniques used, treatment thought to reduce symptoms/increase symptoms and contraindications.

Conclusions: This sample of osteopaths believed endometriosis was oestrogen dependent. The 1-4 grading of endometriosis was crucial to understand the effect of osteopathic treatment. It was concluded that osteopathic treatment in grade 1-2 endometriosis could help to reduce symptoms but 3-4 required Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) inhibition or surgical intervention.